Friday, June 29, 2007

The Fantastic in Art and Fiction


'The Fantastic in Art and Fiction' is an image bank and online exhibition curated by the Cornell Institute for Digital Collections. The website offers an illustrated and scholarly overview of the gothic and supernatural fantastic, as seen in historical art and book illustration. Images are available at several sizes and can be sorted by theme. The majority of the 295 images are black and white or tinted, and most are book illustrations. There are short introductory texts for each section, and suggestions for further reading.
Link: http://fantastic.library.cornell.edu/
Access: Free

Photo Historians


PhotoHistorians is a simple website that acts as a worldwide clearing house for scholars to notify others of their research interests in the history of photography. It is run by William Allen of Arkansas State University. It is possible to dowload the PhotoHistorians directory database as an ASP documen, but the database can be searched online by term or name.
Link: http://www.clt.astate.edu/wallen/photohistorians/
Access: Free

Magnum Festival 07


Commemorating the 60th anniversary of Magnum Photos and the establishment of the Magnum Foundation, Magnum Festival '07 will explore documentary in its various forms – photography, film and journalism.
Information on festival exhibitions and events can be found on the festival website.
Link: http://festival.magnumphotos.com/
Access: Free

Videogame Dissertations


The Game Career website now hosts copies of academic dissertations and theses about computer gaming and games. It is free to access, and currently offers about 30 full-text theses on various aspects of videogames, with topics ranging from technical matters to titles such as 'Watching Games and Playing Movies: The Influence on Cinema on Computer Games' and 'Storytelling in Single Player Action Computer Games'.
Link: http://www.gamecareerguide.com/archives/theses/1/index.php
Access: Free

Tuesday, June 26, 2007

Latin American Art

Following student requests, we have identified Latin American art as a priority collecting area of late, and have been busy building up the Library's collection in this area. The books below are the first of these new books to arrive, and will be joined by others in the near future. Full details are available in the Library Catalogue.
Link: http://library.gsa.ac.uk:6080/TalisPrism/doSearch.do

Armando Reveron by Luis Perez-Oranas

Helio Oiticica: The Body of Colour

Iran do Espirito Santo by Paolo Colombo (ed.)

Gabriel Orozco by Yve-Alain Bois

Version and Inversions: Perspectives on Avant-Garde Art in Latin America by Hector Olea (ed.)




Conservations with Jesus Soto by Ariel Jimerez


Readings in Latin American Modern Art by Patrick Frank




Latin American Art of the 20th Century by Edward Lucie-Smith



Mar Magdalene Campos-Pons: Everything Is Separated By Water




Mexico and Modern Printmaking by John Ittman (ed.)



Listen Here Now! Argentine Art in the 1960s by Ines Katzenstein




The Hours: Contemporary Art for Latin American by Michael Herzog et. al.


Transcontinental: Nine Latin American Artists by Guy Brett (ed.)


Julio Larraz by Edward Lucie-Smith

Lucia Nogueira: Drawings

Thursday, June 21, 2007

ESDS Thematic Guides


The Economic and Social Data Service provides statistical information and data on culture and society. It has just released an expanded portfolios of thematic guides, that introduce some of the data sources available in subject areas such as gender, pollution, youth culture, and ethnicity.
Link: http://www.esds.ac.uk/support/thematicguides.asp
Access: Athens

Friday, June 15, 2007

Big Art Mob

Channel 4 has launched an initiative to create the 1st comprehensive map of public art across the UK. Big Art Mob is a collective blog which encourages members of the public to send in photos of public artworks from their mobile phones.
Access: Free

Drawing in Fibre - Anna King

Drawing in Fibre is a virtual exhibition from Craft Scotland. It explores the influences and inspirations of Scottish artist Anna King and includes 2 films in which she demonstrates the technique of making string from plant fibre.

Artists' Use of Self Image


WHY ME? ARTIST’S USE OF SELF IMAGE is a new research database available from AHDS Visual Arts.
The database contains the names of over 340 artists worldwide who feature their own physical presence within the artworks they present. The database was constructed in 2007 by Anne Seagrave, artist and AHRC Fellow with the Research Institute, School of Art and Design, University of Ulster in Belfast.
The database is a unique resource for researchers and the arts world. As Seagrave explains, “there’s only a very small amount of reference material covering artists’ use of self-image. You can find some information about self-portraiture in painting and photography and a fairly small amount dealing with live art, but there's nothing that links different artists who choose to use self-image. More importantly, there is an enormous amount of creative contribution out there which is not represented in the glossy magazines and publications found in galleries and art school libraries.”
Access: Free

Tuesday, June 12, 2007

SCRAN Podcasts


SCRAN has just launched a new suite of podcasts to accompany the high-quality image content it provides. They are available in both mp3 format as audio only and the advanced format mpeg4 which includes a slideshow as well as audio.
SCRAN provides high-quality art and media images to your desktop, accessed through your Athens account.
Access: Free

FourDocs


This award-winning website from Channel 4. Anyone can submit a 4 minute documentary to be included on the website: full instructions on how to do this are given, alongside access to a 'rushes' library of copyright-cleared music and video clips that you can incorporate into your documentary if you wish.
The site contains numerous films covering every subject imaginable - you can browse via title or theme and watch the documentaries online using standard viewing software, though you need to register with the site to be able to upload material. The website also includes a blog, details on documentary film-makers, a discussion forum, a news page and an archive section. The latter contains information on the history of documentaries, but also access to an archive of full-lengh documentaries, dating from the early 1900's to the present, all of which can also be viewed online.
Access: Free

Business Information: Fashion


This website contains a selective list of resources on the fashion industry. It was compiled by the British Library. Headings covered include: directories, market research & statistics, trade magazines and newsletters, electronic resources at the British Library, Internet sources and companies operating in the sector such as designers. Items contain bibliographic details such as title and publisher as well as a brief description on the publication or source.
Access: Free

London Tube Map Archive


The London Tube Map Archive is a small online exhibition of one of the great icons of British graphic design, the diagrammatic map of the London underground transport system. The webpage contains 25 variant examples of the famous map, from 1908 until 1999.
Access: Free

Andy Goldsworthy Digital Catalogue


The Andy Goldsworthy Digital Catalogue is the official DVD catalogue of the early works of artist and photographer Andy Goldsworthy (1956-). The Digital Catalogue is available on a strictly-controlled DVD held at the University of Glasgow. However, a free online preview of images from the DVD is available online.
The website offers 160 images from the 3,500 images on the DVD. This small online selection is browsable by year, form or material. The website also has reliable biographical details for Andy Goldsworthy, including an exhibition history, timeline and bibliography, all covering the period 1976-1986. The website also has brief details of Goldsworthy's extensive personal 35mm slide archives that are held at his home in Penpont, Dumfriesshire.
Access: Free

George Hallett Photographer


George Hallett was commissioned by the Times Educational Supplement to take photographs of the black community in the Handsworth are of Birmingham a in 1971 and 1972. Soho House Museum hosted an exhibition of these photographs in 2002, and it has now been made available online as part of Digital Handsworth, a project to provide a multimedia resource guide to the history of the ancient West Midlands parish of Handsworth, near Birmingham, England.
Link: http://tinyurl.com/23acrs
Access: Free

London College of Fashion Paper Patterns


This digital image collection includes 620 images from the London College of Fashion's Paper Patterns collection. The collection has accumulated over the years and now numbers some 800 dating from the 1920s to the present day.
The information that the patterns can provide about the history of fashion, the cascade of couture down to everyday wear and the culturally significant phenomena of home dressmaking in Europe and America makes them worthy of preservation and promotion. The collection can be searched by date or decade (where the date of publication is unknown); the name of the pattern publishers e.g. Vogue, Simplicity, McCall etc.; the type of garment e.g. dress, skirt etc or the name of the designer where this is specified.
Access: Free

Monday, June 11, 2007

Romanesque Sculpture


A further 5000 images from the Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland (CRSBI) are now available online via AHDS Visual Arts. This latest addition brings the total number of digital images available from the CRSBI to almost 19,000 images.
The CRSBI project aims to photograph and record all surviving British and Irish Romanesque sculpture. A team of skilled and dedicated volunteer fieldworkers locates and visits sites where Romanesque sculpture survives, describing, measuring and taking photographs.
This latest collection include images from the magnificent Ely Cathedral, Chester Cathdral, St Albans Cathedral and Peterborough Cathedral, as well as churches and buildings throughout the counties of Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Cheshire, Hampshire, Hertfordshire, Huntington, Lincolnshire, Staffordshire and Sussex.
Link: http://vads.ahds.ac.uk/collections/CRSBI.html
Access: Free

Digital Art by Aileen Collis


Aileen Collis is Digital Artist in Residence at the Archives Hub, creating a new digital image inspired by archive material each week.
Aileen has recently completed two years as Artist in Residence in Textiles and Paper, part of the School of Materials at The University of Manchester. Having graduated from Liverpool John Moores University with a degree in Fine Art in 1992, Aileen then went on to work as an Assistant Conservator in the Paper Conservation Department at National Museums Liverpool, from 1992 - 2003. Her work in conservation included re-mounting botanical specimens from an historic herbarium, conserving and re-housing an archive of large format photographic negatives, and repairing water-damaged historical documents. In 2003, Aileen left NML to return to full-time education, completing an MA course in Surface Pattern Design at the University of Central Lancashire in 2005. Aileen's design process begins with photography, which is then manipulated using computer software to create multi-faceted, decorative patterns.
Access: Free

Parliament and the British Slave Trade




'Parliament & The British Slave Trade 1600 - 1807' has been produced for the Parliamentary Archives, to mark the bicentenary of the abolition of Britain's transatlantic slave trade. The website uses original source material, interwoven with narrative from expert historians, to tell the story of Parliament's complex relationship with the British slave trade. The aim of the website is to enable the public to explore the issues, encourage comment and online debate. The website will draw on and provide access to documents held by the Parliamentary Archives, including the Act of 1807 which abolished the trade, evidence taken by Parliamentary enquiries and petitions.
Some of the most interesting documents on the website include a certificate from 1681, signed by the Lord Great Chamberlain which permits tea, coffee and (hot) chocolate making in a part of the Palace of Westminster, a cartoon by James Gillray from 1792 satirising the boycott of sugar by the Royal Household, and, a letter signed by Africans working at Cape Coast Castle in 1749 in support of the Governor.
Access: Free