Friday, January 30, 2009

Echinoderms

The Bibliodyssey blog has just published digitised images of Echinoderms (Phylum Echinodermata), an exclusively marine invertebrate animal species displaying radial symmetry as adults. This group includes sea urchins and starfish.
Link: http://bibliodyssey.blogspot.com/2009/01/echinodermata.html
Access: Free

Graphic Novels in GSA Library

We've just uploaded the latest version of our Guide to Graphic Novels in GSA Library to the Library Website. The guide provides details, cover artwork and descriptions for all the graphic novels in the Library's expanding collection.
Link: http://www2.gsa.ac.uk/library/collections/collections_graphicnovels.html

Thursday, January 29, 2009

Public Art Resource+Research Scotland

This is the website of Public Art Resource+Research Scotland (PAR+RS), a new initiative developed by the Scottish Arts Council to "promote excellence and innovation within public art". The website has a news section with opportunities and developments, and there are also a number of featured articles available in full-text. The 'Blogs and Reflections' section of the website has blogs from invited writers reporting on live and complete projects and events. The 'Archive' provides details of previous public art projects and includes information about the commissioning process, funding and outcomes. Other content on the website includes information about how to contribute, a forum for registered users and a tools section, which includes links to useful information for artists on external websites.
Link: http://www.publicartscotland.com/
Access: Free

Florida Broadsides

This website forms part of the Florida Memory website maintained by the State Archives of Florida. It provides free access to a collection of more than 200 digitised images of broadsides (posters, leaflets, petitions, flyers, advertisements, political cartoons) and other ephemeral such as pamphlets and newspaper articles relating to the social, political and economic history of Florida during the period 1800-2000. Themes of particular interest to social scientists include political cartoons relating to US national and local elections; materials relating to race and slavery.
Link: http://www.floridamemory.com/collections/broadsides/
Access: Free

Artists' Illustrated Letters

The Getting the Picture website provides a selection of artists' illustrated letters from the collection of the Smithsonian Archives of American Art. The collection encompasses "exuberant thank you notes, winsome love letters, lively reports of current events, graphic instructions and other personalized communiqués from the early nineteenth century through the 1980s." It gives a wonderful insight into the private world of the artist. Artists include: Alexander Calder; Dale Chihuly; Marcel Duchamp; Thomas Eakins; Winslow Homer; Roy Lichtenstein; Man Ray; Eero Saarinen; Antoine de Saint-Exupéry; and Andy Warhol.
Link: http://www.aaa.si.edu/exhibits/exhibit-illustratedletters/
Access: Free

The Language of New Media


Parsing the Languages of the New Media is a blog about Lev Manovich's book 'The Language of New Media' (MIT Press, 2001), which took an academic approach to discussing the new media (the computer, the Internet), computer-mediated art, and new media art practices within the framework of historical visual and media cultures.
The blog was created by David Witzling, a postgraduate film student at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. It offers page-by-page commentaries on the book, with cross-linking, and links embedded in the text to other websites, offering further explanation.
Link: http://media.frametheweb.com/
Access: Free

Grand Alphabet Amusant

The Bibliodyssey blog has just published digital images of Grand Alphabet Amusant by E Morel 1890.
Link: http://bibliodyssey.blogspot.com/2009/01/grand-alphabet-amusant.html
Access: Free

Guy Delisle

The Library stocks a number of graphic novels by Guy Delisle, who specialises in documenting distant and not-too-distant lands and their foibles. Since September, Guy Delisle and his family have been in Jerusalem, as this is where his wife is stationed with Doctors without Borders. He has been keeping a blog, including a detailed entry from January 20th on how MSW tried to enter into Gaza.
Link: http://www.guydelisle.com/WordPress/
Access: Free

Find Any Film

Find Any Film is a database of films that are available in the UK, supported and funded by the UK Film Council. It claims to have every film available in the UK. Just type in the film that you're interested in, or browse by genre. Once a film has been located you get to see the trailer (if one is available), a full summary and film viewing options. The resource will find places that a particular film is showing; at the cinema, on TV, on DVD or Blu-ray, if it's available for download, watching online or in other formats.
Link: http://www.findanyfilm.com/search
Access: Free

House of Fraser Archive


The House of Fraser Archive offers a fascinating glimpse into the history of one of Britain's leading department stores. House of Fraser has a long and distinguished history. Founded in 1849 as a small drapery shop on the corner of Argyle Street and Buchanan Street in Glasgow, it expanded rapidly, acquiring some 200 different stores, and opening branches in many parts of the world.
The University of Glasgow Archives, where the archive is held, has now produced a guide to the company's history.
Link: http://tinyurl.com/5ppuhg
Access: Free

Ernest Arthur Binstead

University of Glasgow Archives has made available 2 digitised sketchbooks of artist Ernest Arthur Binstead.
Binstead was a keen amateur artist who produced beautiful pencil drawings and watercolour sketches of the activities that went on around him during the first years of the twentieth century. During 2008, his niece, Miss Lee, donated two of his sketchbooks to Archive Services for permanent preservation. This exhibition is made up of digitised images of each of the sketches in the two sketchbooks.
Link: http://www.gla.ac.uk/services/archives/exhibitions/ernestarthurbinstead/
Access: Free

Wednesday, January 28, 2009

Library Secures Major Design Library of James Templeton & Co and Stoddard International

The design archive and heritage carpet collection of James Templeton & Co and Stoddard International, Scotland’s most successful carpet manufacturers, has been bought by the University of Glasgow in conjunction with Glasgow School of Art and Glasgow Museums with the assistance of a £172,000 grant from the National Heritage Memorial Fund.
As part of the project, the firm's former design library will come to Glasgow School of Art Library, along with a substantial number of large design folios that were used by the carpet designers to inform and inspire their work.
A long-term programme of work to catalogue the library and make it available for study will be formulated upon its arrival.
You can read the press release here:
Link: http://www.gla.ac.uk/news/headline_107179_en.html

Library Display: Pop-Up Artists' Books



The latest display of works from the Library's Artists' Books Collection highlights pop-up books and structures.
Kara Walker's Freedom: A Fable tells the narrative tale of a 19th century negress, presented as a Victorian pastiche with stark and intricate black paper pop-ups. The cover is in bonded leather with a Norwegian finish.
Ronald King's Alphabeta Concertina is in the form on a accordion style strip. Pop-ups form the letters of the alphabet, A-M to the front, and N-Z to the rear. The front and rear boards are printed white on red and feature abstract representations of the letters A and Z.
Scott McCarney's Alphabook 3 present 2 separate books in concertina form, one with pop-ups running A-Z, and the second running back through Z-A.
J. Yoon's Absence was produced to commemorate the 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, and features white card pages punctured by pin pricks and square cut-outs. These cut-outs increase in number through the pages of the book to eventually resemble the grid plan on New York, represented metaphorically through emptiness and absence.

British Colonist, 1858-1910

The British Colonist, 1858-1910 is a digitisation project presented by the University of Victoria and several libraries in British Columbia, Canada, to celebrate the 150th birthday of the Victoria Times Colonist newspaper, previously known as The British Colonist. The project has scanned over 100,000 pages of the newspaper from the turn of the century, and the texts can be downloaded.
A brief history of the newspaper is provided, as are search engines allowing searches by dates, keywords and phrases. There is also a very good historical calendar browse function.
Link: http://www.britishcolonist.ca/
Access: Free

Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Katherine Dunham Collection

This website provides access to a range of materials taken from the Katherine Dunham Collection at the Library of Congress. Comprising a selection of photographs, videos and texts, this web presentation documents the life and career of a woman who has been credited with changing the face of American modern dance, largely through introducing African and Caribbean dance movement to the public. Photographs are taken from the Library of Congress, the Missouri Historical Society, and Southern Illinois University. The database allows searching by keyword, and searching can be limited by factors such as name of ballet, and format. Other features include a chronological timeline, featuring photographs of Dunham.
Link: http://tinyurl.com/de6a76
Access: Free

Thread

This is the website of the BBC's online magazine Thread, which deals with the concept of eco-fashion. The website can be viewed in an Adobe Flash version or as HTML. It contains a collection of feature articles, including: Reports on subjects such as sustainability, ethical designers, working conditions, fair trade and waste management; Columns from regular writers; How-To Guides, including conservation and construction tips, and instructions on finding ethical fashion; Galleries including current trends and recommendations. There are a number of BBC videos on the website including interviews with designers, and in depth reports. An archive of Style Files contains photo shoots of eco-fashion looks with details of suppliers and prices.
Link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/thread/
Access: Free

Grandma's Graphics


Grandma's Graphics offers dozens of public domain children’s illustrations, including the work of Sir John Tenniel for Lewis Carroll’s Alice books, Emma E. Clark, and Mabel Hill.
Link: http://www.grandmasgraphics.com/
Access: Free

Cape Farewell

Cape Farewell was formed in 2001 by artist David Buckland to investigate cultural responses to climate change. The collective invites groups of artists, writers and commentators on to expeditions to places such as Greenland, to produce writings and art works in response to the world's changing climate. The website includes a host of online media, including blogs, images and videos.
Link: http://www.capefarewell.com/home.html
Access: Free

Friday, January 23, 2009

Sewing Machines

Published by the Smithsonian Institution Libraries (SIL), the Sewing Machines website provides a guide to the libraries' trade literature collections, relating to sewing machines from the 1840s onwards. The collections include sewing machine catalogues, and ephemera relating to sewing machine companies, (for example, trade cards, fliers, manuals, parts lists etc.).
There are also digital versions of two books available: Grace Rogers Cooper's 'The Sewing Machine: Its Invention and Development' (Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1976. 2d ed., rev. and expanded) and Frederick Lewis Lewton's 'The Servant in the House: A Brief History of the Sewing Machine' (Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1930).
The 'explore the collection' section allows you to search by machine model, title, and company, and browse by standard company name, or company name on item.


Access: Free

Thursday, January 22, 2009

National Film Board of Canada

The National Film Board of Canada’s new film site makes hundreds of animated films, documentaries, and experimental films freely available online.
Link: http://www.nfb.ca/
Access: Free

Tuesday, January 20, 2009

Mikhail Maiofis

The Bibliodyssey blog has just posted a series of illustrations by Mikhail Maiofis. "Mikhail Maiofis was born in St. Petersburg Russia and was an accomplished artist at a very young age. He is best known for his illustrations of children's books, most notably the famous Adventures of Baron Von Munchausen."
Link: http://bibliodyssey.blogspot.com/2009/01/mikhail-maiofis-illustrations.html
Access: Free

Monday, January 19, 2009

University of Stirling’s Art Collection

The University of Stirling’s Art Collection includes over 300 paintings, sketches, tapestries, sculpture and silver, collected since 1967. The collection includes works by Patrick Heron, Terry Frost, Graham Sutherland and J.D. Fergusson, as well as site-specific works commissioned during the construction of new buildings.
Link: http://www.artcol.stir.ac.uk/
Access: Free

Wednesday, January 14, 2009

Heraldic Devices


The Bavarian State Library has just placed online an album of heraldic devices or family crests of the noble families of Verona and Vicenza, one of a series of fifteen manuscripts prepared for Duke Albrecht V of Bavaria in the 16th century.
Link: http://mdzx.bib-bvb.de/codicon/Band_bsb00001423.html
Access: Free

Birds by Constantino Brumidi


Part of the United States Senate's website, this online exhibition features some enlargeable images from the Senate's corridors of the designs of birds painted by the Italian/Greek-American historical painter, Constantino Brumidi (1805-1880).
Capitalising on a growing interest in ornithology in the early part of the 19th century, and inspired by early 15th-century Renaissance frescoes in the Vatican Palace, Constantino Brumidi spent more than 25 years of his life painting, decorating, and beautifying the corridors, committee rooms, and Rotunda of the Capitol, with designs of more than 350 individual birds from at least 100 species. The corridors are still known as the Brumidi corridors to this day.
Link: http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/art/birds/land.jsp
Access: Free

Stamps: British Design Classics


The Royal Mail has just revealed its latest set of stamps, all based on British design classics: "From the distinctive lines of R J Mitchell’s Spitfire fighter and the stylish chic of Mary Quant’s daring mini skirt to the calm of the Penguin Books jacket and the practicality of Robin Day’s Polypropylene chair."
Link: http://tinyurl.com/83glae
Access: Free

Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Xavier Le Roy

French choreographer Xavier Le Roy defies categorisation as a dance-maker, drawing on diverse influences from the worlds of science, performance art and contemporary dance. In Self Unfinished (1998), Le Roy takes the audience on a journey of metamorphosis as he transforms into an extraordinary hybrid creature part machine, part alien, part human. Employing all manner of physical devices, Le Roy creates a world of illusion that is as unsettling as it is transfixing.
Link: http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=G3rv1TeVEPM
Access: Free

Friday, January 09, 2009

British Waterways Film Map


Water has long been an inspiration for creativity and, in recent times, canals and rivers have had supporting roles in everything from reality TV to James Bond movies. Now, British Waterways (BW) has mapped out the most iconic film and TV locations on the nation’s 2,200-mile network of canals, rivers and docks, and is inviting the public to discover the real-life film sets on their doorstep.
Link: http://www.waterscape.com/features-and-articles/films
Access: Free

Thursday, January 08, 2009

The Scientific World


The Library now has a subscription to the peer-reviewed e-journal The Scientific World. The journal is foremost an online scientific journal serving the research community with a forum for original research and reviews. TSWJ was launched in 2001 as an innovative way to gather, publish and organize scientific and medical information. Subjects covered include biomedicine and environmental science.
Link: http://www.thescientificworld.co.uk
Access: Free (on-campus only)

New Arcadian Press

The Library has recently purchased a selection of past publications from the New Arcadian Press. The Press was launched in 1981 by Patrick Eyres, Ian Gardner and Grahame Jones and its publications "investigate the design of such Arcadian and Utopian environments as landscape gardens and model communities, and explore landscapes alleged to be "wild"."
The purchase includes a number of issues of the New Arcadian Journal, along with some cards, small books, and broadsheets. All the purchased publications hold some connection to the work of Ian Hamilton Finlay.

The Happy Hypocrite

The Library has now purchased the first 2 issues of new journal The Happy Hypocrite, published by Book Works, London. It is shelved with the current journals on the top floor of the Main Library.
"The Happy Hypocrite is a biannual journal led by artists’ writings. Informed by a lineage of modern experimental and avant-garde magazines, such as Bananas, Documents, The Fox, Merlin and Tracks, the journal aspires to unpack the methodology of such key journals, whilst providing a brand new approach to art writing. It will provide a greatly needed testing ground for new writing and research-based projects, somewhere for artists, writers and theorists to express experimental ideas that might not otherwise be realised or published."
The 1st issue Linguistic Hardcore
contains an interview, a translation, a short story, notes on time, some possible captions, Bananas and an index. In the 2nd issue Hunting and Gathering bodies of new writing present techniques of collage & bricolage, found and image, interspersed with appropriated and parodic writing.

Tuesday, January 06, 2009

LSE Anthropology Photographs


This site provides free access to an online collection of photographs taken by members of academic staff from the Anthropology department at the London School of Economics (LSE). They represent a photographic record of recent ethnographic fieldwork research from around the world.
Link: http://www.lse.ac.uk/library/archive/anthropology_photographs.htm
Access: Free

Monday, January 05, 2009

Peter King Archive


The Peter King Archive has now been extended to include over 1000 entries giving a detailed picture of the life and work of the artist. King’s untimely death at the age of twenty-nine has meant that he has been largely omitted from the history of 1950s British art. His work has now been made available to a wider audience through a digitising project carried out by the artist’s son, Dr Mike King, at London Metropolitan University, and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.
King was undoubtedly a prolific artist whose exceptional talent was recognised by Henry Moore, who appointed him as his assistant along with Anthony Caro. He was part of a group of artists associated with Moore’s studio, with the teaching team at St Martin’s School of Art, with artists living at the Abbey Art Centre in London, and with Victor Musgrave’s Gallery One in Soho.
Link: http://vads.ac.uk/collections/PKA
Access: Free

Darwin Digital Library of Evolution

The Darwin Digital Library of Evolution is based at the American Museum of Natural History Library with contributions from the Natural History Museum (London) and the Missouri Botanical Garden. It is a "a pilot project drawing on resources of members of the Biodiversity Heritage Library Consortium". 98 of the approximately 3,500 references listed in the bibliographies are available in full text. Resources range from seventeenth century works and cover the nineteenth century debates as well as modern evolutionary biology. They are organized in four chronological sections: Ancestors; Darwin; Decendents; and Responses and include works in Darwin's personal library.
Link: http://darwinlibrary.amnh.org/
Access: Free

Godey’s Lady’s Book Online


This is the website for Godey’s Lady’s Book Online. Published by Louis A. Godey and edited by author Sarah Josepha Hale, Godey’s Lady’s Book was "one of the most popular lady's books of the 19th century". Each issue contained poetry, engravings and articles by some of the most well-known authors in America. The website makes available the contents of the January, February, March, April and November, 1850 issues of the Godey’s Lady’s Book, which includes period fashion illustrations, images and plates, poetry and articles on a variety of subjects from history to fashion. This website has been created by the University of Rochester history department.
Link: http://www.history.rochester.edu/godeys/
Access: Free

Tate Papers


Tate's online research journal - includes articles on a wide range of topics reflecting new research into different aspects of the museum's programmes and collection. Articles include:

  • Robert Bird, 'Andrei Tarkovsky and Contemporary Art: Medium and Mediation'
  • Mary Jacobus, 'Rilke and Twombly on the Nile'
  • Jennifer Mundy, 'An Unpublished Drawing by Duchamp: Hell in Philadelphia'
  • Kate Nesin, 'Some Notes on Words and Things in Cy Twombly's Sculptural Practice'
  • Carol A. Nigro, 'Cy Twombly's Humanist Upbringing'
  • Rebecca Sinker, 'On the Evolution of a Peer-led Programme: Tate Forum'
  • Harriet A.L. Standeven, 'The History and Manufacture of Lithol Red, a Pigment Used by Mark Rothko in his Seagram and Harvard Murals of the 1950s and 1960s'
  • Andrea Nixon, 'Advocating to Stakeholders'.
Link: http://www.tate.org.uk/research/tateresearch/tatepapers/
Access: Free